Issue 51

Jacqueline Feldman, The Bot Politic

Conversations like mine with Alexa and Siri reveal more about human expectations than they do about A.I. By creating interactions that encourage consumers to understand the objects that serve them as women, technologists abet the prejudice by which women are

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Jacqueline Feldman, The Bot Politic

Conversations like mine with Alexa and Siri reveal more about human expectations than they do about A.I. By creating interactions that encourage consumers to understand the objects that serve them as women, technologists abet the prejudice by which women are

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Alexandre Echasseriau, Interactive Wallpaper

Alexandre Echasseriau used conductive paint to create delightful interactive wallpaper in which touching parts of the wallpaper triggers various sounds.  

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Alexandre Echasseriau, Interactive Wallpaper

Alexandre Echasseriau used conductive paint to create delightful interactive wallpaper in which touching parts of the wallpaper triggers various sounds.  

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Michael Wolf, The Architecture of Density

In this short interview with Michael Wolf, he describes his photography projects which document the intense density of Hong Kong – whether seen through the seemingly-scaleless architecture or the left-behind traces of people and activity in the back alleys. “If

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Michael Wolf, The Architecture of Density

In this short interview with Michael Wolf, he describes his photography projects which document the intense density of Hong Kong – whether seen through the seemingly-scaleless architecture or the left-behind traces of people and activity in the back alleys. “If

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Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz, Hole In Space

For three days in November of 1980, Hole-In-Space allowed strangers in Century City LA and outside Licoln Center in New York to communicate in real time via life-sized television screens. Created by artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz — well before

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Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz, Hole In Space

For three days in November of 1980, Hole-In-Space allowed strangers in Century City LA and outside Licoln Center in New York to communicate in real time via life-sized television screens. Created by artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz — well before

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