Jacqueline Feldman, The Bot Politic

Conversations like mine with Alexa and Siri reveal more about human expectations than they do about A.I. By creating interactions that encourage consumers to understand the objects that serve them as women, technologists abet the prejudice by which women are

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Jacqueline Feldman, The Bot Politic

Conversations like mine with Alexa and Siri reveal more about human expectations than they do about A.I. By creating interactions that encourage consumers to understand the objects that serve them as women, technologists abet the prejudice by which women are

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Alexandre Echasseriau, Interactive Wallpaper

Alexandre Echasseriau used conductive paint to create delightful interactive wallpaper in which touching parts of the wallpaper triggers various sounds.  

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Alexandre Echasseriau, Interactive Wallpaper

Alexandre Echasseriau used conductive paint to create delightful interactive wallpaper in which touching parts of the wallpaper triggers various sounds.  

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Michael Wolf, The Architecture of Density

In this short interview with Michael Wolf, he describes his photography projects which document the intense density of Hong Kong – whether seen through the seemingly-scaleless architecture or the left-behind traces of people and activity in the back alleys. “If

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Michael Wolf, The Architecture of Density

In this short interview with Michael Wolf, he describes his photography projects which document the intense density of Hong Kong – whether seen through the seemingly-scaleless architecture or the left-behind traces of people and activity in the back alleys. “If

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Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz, Hole In Space

For three days in November of 1980, Hole-In-Space allowed strangers in Century City LA and outside Licoln Center in New York to communicate in real time via life-sized television screens. Created by artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz — well before

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Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz, Hole In Space

For three days in November of 1980, Hole-In-Space allowed strangers in Century City LA and outside Licoln Center in New York to communicate in real time via life-sized television screens. Created by artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz — well before

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Jacqueline Feldman, “Verbal Tics: As bots grow up, like us, their bugs become their features”

This bot thinks thanks to a statistical classifier that labels sentences it’s seen previously with a 1 and not a 0. It lives under the assumption that nothing will be novel, as if out of faith. It fields sentences by

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Jacqueline Feldman, “Verbal Tics: As bots grow up, like us, their bugs become their features”

This bot thinks thanks to a statistical classifier that labels sentences it’s seen previously with a 1 and not a 0. It lives under the assumption that nothing will be novel, as if out of faith. It fields sentences by

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Empire, Jongsma and O’Neill

In a stunning web-doc format, Jongsma and O’Neill present the unintended and lasting consequences of Dutch colonialism.

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Empire, Jongsma and O’Neill

In a stunning web-doc format, Jongsma and O’Neill present the unintended and lasting consequences of Dutch colonialism.

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Kamil Kotarba, Hide and Seek

The endless refrain of “Stop looking at you phone!” is reinforced through Kamil Kotarba’s photographs of disembodied limbs attached to smartphones.

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Kamil Kotarba, Hide and Seek

The endless refrain of “Stop looking at you phone!” is reinforced through Kamil Kotarba’s photographs of disembodied limbs attached to smartphones.

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Geoff Manaugh, Where The Roads Have No Name

”Arsenault flipped to a few pages in Granville’s first town survey book to convey the difficulty involved in interpreting these old coördinates. Roads were described as commencing at stumps, or “beginning on the old road near a maple tree.” They

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Geoff Manaugh, Where The Roads Have No Name

”Arsenault flipped to a few pages in Granville’s first town survey book to convey the difficulty involved in interpreting these old coördinates. Roads were described as commencing at stumps, or “beginning on the old road near a maple tree.” They

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